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Authentic Confederate Manufactured or Used Swords and Firearms of the Civil War
Edged Weapons
Boyle Style Confederate Made Cavalry Saber With 2nd Alabama Cavalry Attribution
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This is a beautiful looking Confederate cavalry saber! This is the classic unmarked version that has lovingly been nicknamed by collectors as the "Dog River" Confederate cavalry saber that is patterned after the U.S. model 1840 cavalry known as the "wristbreaker". They get this nickname because some of the unmarked cavalry sabers were made by the factory on the Dog River in Georgia or Alabama. The fact is that most of the swords that are unmarked with this nickname were made throughout the south at arsenals and retailers both large and small. This particular design has long been attributed to the Richmond, Virginia firm of Boyle & Gamble. This firm was one of the largest producers of edged weapons for the Confederate cavalry during the Civil War. Their swords have a distinctive curve to the grip and other traits that allow us to know it is one of their products. This one has a beautiful full-length blade that measures 34-1/2 inches. It has the hand hammer marks that are a classic trait of a Southern made edged weapon. It also has the correct single fuller groove down each side of the blade. The guard and pommel cap have a beautiful untouched patina all over with the ancient honey color patina. The handle still retains the wooden core as well as the leather wrapping. It has the thick single-strand wire wrapped around the leather. You can tell when you look at the pommel cap that this beauty has never been apart. The sword is accompanied by an original scabbard that is not the original one for the sword. It is a model 1840 "Wristbreaker" scabbard that fits the sword well. The scabbard has the mounts with the iron rings still attached. It is missing the throat of the scabbard it has the iron construction as is the drag. It is accompanied by a letter from Civil War dealer, Brian Akins, stating that this gun was attributed to Joseph W. Gooding of the 10th Tennessee Confederate Cavalry, one of the famous regiments that served with Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest. It states that the revolver was purchased from the family by early collector Rowland Bill. This piece of history came has spent the last decade in the museum like personal collection of Mathew Woodburn. If you have wanted an attributed Southern made cavalry saber that doesn't cost ten thousand dollars then this one is for you.


Item #: B2280
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